26 Jan 2008

Photographers' rights

There is a very interesting thread running on one of the photography forums right now about the legal rights of photographers, and how they affect you taking photographs in the street.

I have already made my thoughts very clear about the freedom of photographers to take photographs what they wish in a public place. However, there is a link on this thread that UK photographers might find very useful. It is to a downloadable pdf file setting out the legal position. It was written in 2004 and is due for an update so bear that in mind.

http://www.sirimo.co.uk/ukpr.php/2004/11/19/uk_photographers_rights_guide

That forum group is something very special to me. I did not start it and do not have any say in the running of it. It was started by a group of my former students and is going from strength to strength. There is a great deal of sharing of information.

I know that the moderator, Maria, would make you most welcome if you wanted to join and I’m convinced you will enjoy the fun company.
Go take a look…

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/photoactive_photographers

I’m running one of my Photography Weekends here in Kirkcudbright this weekend so my time to post on the blog is pretty limited. I’m working with a great group of photographers and everyone seems to be enjoying themselves – keep you fingers cross for us tomorrow – we need some good light and weather.

2 comments:

CarlDania said...

Reminds me of an article I read some months back. A guy was taking photographs at a carnival / parade, a public event in a public place.Private security staff drew him on one side and told him to stop. He protested, so they called some police officers over.The police(in a rather difficult situation)suggested that he should accept a 'verbal caution' for 'unauthorised photography'So he made a formal complaint.He eventually received a rather dismissive letter from the Chief Constable 'regretting the misunderstanding' and citing 'anti-terrorist'legislation.Having spent 24 years in the police, my mind boggles. I have a theory, for what it is worth, that the alleged conduct of the paparazzi pursuing Princess Diana has coloured the public view regarding street photography. Together with a general view that any activity has to be licensed or controlled in some way. Which has nothing to do with photography as I understand it.

Dennis COCC Roadtech said...

I have had situations also here in the US. I was in Boston and found a building that was lit with cool colors that I wanted to photograph - a large security person came out and told me I cannot citing Sept. 11. He was nice about it and I stopped. I had a restaurant owner come out and tell me to stop taking pictures of his entrance (nice Asian decorated doorway) - I was on the public sidewalk. I was at a mall taking sunset pictures from the parking lot and the security guard driving around asked me what I was doing and said it is a private place and he was going to take down my license number. I told him I had the right and he said I didn't. He radioed his superior who told him to drop it. I was in Boston another time in a public park taking photos of the boats on the harbor. A guy drove over to me and asked me what I was doing and said they don't like me taking pictures of the boats.

Here are a couple of news stories from USA Today about it (I had to use tinyURL because it was cutting it off):

http://tiny.cc/EI7rY
http://tiny.cc/2dydQ

Here is from the writer of the story:

http://tiny.cc/jAyVg

I really cannot stand people sighting the Sept. 11 and trying to rob me of my rights (not to mention trying to scare everyone - that is more than the terrorists could have asked for).




Dennis
(http://www.flickr.com/photos/djh_cinemas)